Header Image - Green4All Blog

The Stream, September 30: Indonesia Communities Struggle As They Are Displaced By Dams

by g4allblog 0 Comments
The  Global Rundown

The Global Rundown

A spate of dam-building in Indonesia is flooding out communities, and residents say they are receiving little compensation. A drought in Costa Rica is causing daily water outages for thousands of people, while dry conditions in Colombia are prompting the government to spend millions on drinking water deliveries and firefighting efforts. Doctors in Flint, Michigan, say they found more children with elevated levels of lead in their blood after the city switched its water supply, while a lawsuit in Idaho asks for more information about the government’s nuclear waste storage plans. A new plan to protect trout in the western United States goes into effect today, and an app from Twitter will allow users to watch this year’s Serengeti animal migration live.

“Sending rising waters to flood out people like ​pests​ is barbaric. Indonesia has the resources and know-how to resettle these people decently.”–Michael Cernea, a senior scholar at the​ Washington, D.C.-based ​Brookings Institution, on a string of new dams being built in Indonesia, where communities are being flooded and residents say they are still waiting for compensation from the government. (Bloomberg)

By the Numbers

By The Numbers

700,000 people Number in Costa Rica who will experience daily water outages over the next nine months as drought conditions persist and the country enters its annual dry season. ICR News

$4.2 million Amount Colombia set aside to deliver drinking water and combat forest fires as the country endures an El Nino-linked drought. Colombia Reports

Science

Science, Studies, And Reports

The percentage of young children living in Flint, Michigan, who have elevated levels of lead in their blood nearly doubled after the city switched its water source to the Flint River last year, according to research by local doctors who cautioned that the study does not prove causality. The findings are the latest in a string of water quality concerns the city has been confronting since it moved off Detroit’s water system. NPR

A new app from Twitter will allow users to view the massive animal migration from Serengeti National Park to the Maasai Mara reserve this year. The app will stream live video twice a day of animals moving across the landscape in their seasonal search for water. Guardian

On the Radar

On The Radar

A lawsuit in Idaho seeks to force the federal government to reveal more details about its plan to transport nuclear waste to the Idaho National Laboratory. A previous legal agreement banned similar shipments and asked for the removal of waste from the site to protect an aquifer used for drinking water. Reuters

A new plan to protect threatened bull trout in the western United States will take effect today amid criticism from environmental groups that it does not do enough. Warming water temperatures and lower water levels in western streams are putting added pressure on populations of the fish, according to scientists. Reuters

The post The Stream, September 30: Indonesia Communities Struggle As They Are Displaced By Dams appeared first on Circle of Blue WaterNews.

Source: Water News

Source: Water Industry News

How Healing Sexual Shame Is Good for the Environment

by g4allblog 0 Comments
How Healing Sexual Shame Is Good for the Environment

couple in love herbs for sexuality

Can shame free sex lead to a healthier relationship with the environment? 

Find out in this Green Divas Eco Sexy radio segment, then read on for more…

More and more we’re discovering just how interconnected all life on our beautiful and increasingly small planet is.

Smog emanating from China is carried by the winds all the way to the western United States, where it causes nearly as much air pollution as automobiles. The decimation of rainforests in South America and Africa disrupts the entire planet’s hydrological cycles, and lowers atmospheric oxygen levels everywhere on earth. The list of unexpected ripple effects is endless, really.

As a sexologist and relationship coach, I spend a lot of time thinking about how human sexuality and relationships affect the planet. That may not be intuitive to most people. But if you think about it, it might begin to make more sense.

For instance, a lot of people have been taught to feel shame about sex. And that unfortunately can lead to a lot of sexual activity without a lot of thought. The basic biology still drives us toward sexual behaviors, but we are not using our big brains to make wise decisions about that sexual behavior.

Sexual shame can cause us to have sex without taking precautions to avoid sexually transmitted infections and pregnancy. The personal results are, of course, well known to most of us. But what impact does that have on a global scale?

Sexually transmitted infections including HIV are more prevalent in areas where there is little or no sex education. The Centers for Disease Control’s HIV Surveillance Report maps the prevalence of HIV by state in the United States; and not surprisingly higher rates of HIV infection occur in those states that do not offer comprehensive sex education. The correlation between comprehensive sex education and transmission of HIV occurs on a global scale as well.menopause can be sexy .. man and woman lovers

Lack of comprehensive sex education also leads to higher unwanted pregnancies. This is one of the reasons why the world’s least developed countries, those which can least afford their populations to grow, are facing a doubling, or even a tripling of their populations by 2050.

One of the biggest obstacles to comprehensive sex education is sexual shame. That sexual shame can take many forms, including parents having difficulty discussing the topic in an open and loving way, and parents being afraid that their children will engage in sex if they know how to protect themselves from disease and pregnancy. And sexual shame can also take the form of religious taboos regarding a variety of sexual behaviors including premarital sex and homosexuality.

A shame-based culture makes it difficult for people to learn more successful ways of relating to each other and to our planet.

Shame makes it impossible for us to face our feelings because it cuts us off from ourselves and makes us act unconsciously in important portions of our lives. We can’t solve problems we can’t talk about.

Our sexual shame prevents us from seeing the sexual and emotional realities of other sentient beings. We turn away from the bonobo, an ape that could serve as a wonderful example of sex as an antidote to our mean world, if we were not afraid to look at their pansexual ways.

Can healing sexual shame shift human culture toward a healthier relationship with the environment? 

I believe so. If we can move past our sexual shame and embrace sexuality, not only as a healthy part of life, but also as an important tool for shifting our perspective from one of competition to one of cooperation, we might be able to move to a global model of sharing resources and solutions to our energy needs.

Sex as a solution to global climate change? Exactly. Stay tuned for more on that.

Bonus:

Listen to this Green Divas Eco Sexy episode featuring Jennifer J. Reed about folks who have actually married the earth

Catch the latest Green Divas Radio Show—and other green, healthy and free radio shows—daily on GDGDRadio.com (or get the GDGD Radio app)!

Image via ShutterStock


(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({});

The post How Healing Sexual Shame Is Good for the Environment appeared first on The Green Divas.

Source: GreenDivas News