Header Image - Green4All Blog

2 Yummy, Simple Brain-Boosting Recipes

by g4allblog 0 Comments
2 Yummy, Simple Brain-Boosting Recipes

brain boosting pumpkin granola

adapted from MariaShriver.com

Recently we held a B.Y.O.B. (Bring Your Own Brain) event in partnership with Equinox to discuss brain-boosting activities and eating habits. Kacie Carter, founder of Human Resources Wellness provided the menu, here are a couple of her health, smart (and yummy!) brain-boosting recipes.

Try them & tell us what you think!

Grain-free Sprouted Pumpkin Granola

Benefits:  mineralizing, healthy fats, antioxidants, low glycemic, energy sustaining, complete protein, bioavailable nutrients, fiber

Cooking Utensils:

  • Large metal bowl
  • Wooden spoon
  • Fruit and vegetable dehydrator OR 2 large pans and oven

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup sprouted almonds
  • 1 cup sprouted sunflower seeds
  • 1 cup sprouted pumpkin seeds
  • 1 cup shredded coconut
  • 1/2 cup pumpkin puree (canned or from a box—100% pumpkin!
  • 1/2 cup sprouted walnuts
  • 1/4 cup goji berries
  • 1/4 cup hemp seeds
  • 1/4 cup cacao nibs
  • 1/4 cup flaxseeds
  • 1 banana, very spotted and ripe
  • 3 tablespoons of maple syrup
  • 2 tablespoons pumpkin pie spice (you can add more if you like it very seasoned!)
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • Pinch of sea salt

Method:

1) In the bottom of a large bowl, mash the ripe banana thoroughly with a knife until you get a pudding consistency.

2) Combine the pumpkin puree and maple syrup with the banana, mixing thoroughly.

3) Add the spices (pumpkin pie spice, cinnamon, sea salt) and stir well.

4) Add the rest of the nuts, seeds, berries, and coconut.

5) Mix everything together well with your hands until well coated. The mixture will be sticky!

6) Spread evenly onto dehydrator racks, “clumping” the granola closely together, about 1/2 inch thick and dehydrate for 6 hours at 95 F.

7) If using an oven, spread granola evenly onto baking sheets and place in the oven at the lowest setting (115 F) and roast lightly for 3 hours, until granola is crunchy.

8) Break up the chunks and store in an airtight container. Will keep for a couple of weeks!

9) Enjoy on top of coconut yogurt, as a trail mix snack, on top of smoothies, granola, and oatmeal!

***You do not have to use sprouted nuts and seeds for this recipe. However, the nutrients are much more absorbable if you use the sprouted forms!

[Read: 6 Brain Foods for a Sharper Mind & Healthier You]

Coconut Probiotic Yogurt

Benefits: fermented, low glycemic, seasonal fruit, healthy fats, gut healing, brain boosting, probiotics

Maria Shriver Hosts B.Y.O.B.- YOGA & MEDITATION to Benefit A Woman's Nation's Alzheimer's Project

Cooking Utensils:

  • High powered blender or food processor, sterilized in hot water
  • 2 glass wide mouth 16 oz mason jars, sterilized
  • 2 plastic lids, sterilized
  • Rubber scraper, sterilized

*Avoid using metal utensils or containers as they can react with the bacteria.

Ingredients:

    • 16 oz. fresh coconut meat, if frozen defrost first
    • 1/4 cup coconut water (or filtered water)
    • 1 tsp raw honey (or 2 drops stevia for sugar free)
    • 1 packet probiotics (50 billion strain—I like “Ultimate Flora” brand!)
    • 1/2 tsp vanilla powder
    • Zest of 1 lemon
    • 8 cherries, pitted or 1/2 cup fruit of your choice!

byob granola yogurt

Method:

1) Combine all ingredients except probiotic powder in a high powered blender.

2) Blend on high until you reach a smooth consistency—about 2 minutes.

3) Add coconut water as needed- consistency should be thick like regular yogurt and not too watery—remember it will thicken more as it ferments overnight!

4) Once all ingredients are thoroughly combined, add the probiotic powder and pulse a few times to fully incorporate.

5) Pour coconut purée into the two mason jars, filling only 3/4 full.

6) Screw lids on loosely.

7) Place the mason jars in a warm space—I’ve found this works best in an oven with just the pilot light on, or if you can set your oven to 100 F.

8) Let sit for 12-24 hours depending on how “tangy” you like your yogurt—the longer it sits, the tangier it will become!

9) Transfer to refrigerator and consume within 2 weeks. Be sure not to double dip into the yogurt!

10) Enjoy!

[Read: Yummy Dairy Free Chocolate Shake Recipe]

Bonus:

Listen to the latest Green Divas Foodie-Philes episode...

Tune in to The Green Divas Radio Show—and other green, healthy and free radio shows—daily on GDGDRadio.com (or get the GDGD Radio app)! 

images via shutterstock.com


(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({});

The post 2 Yummy, Simple Brain-Boosting Recipes appeared first on The Green Divas.

Source: GreenDivas News

Midlife Activism: Never Too Late to Ignite Change

by g4allblog 0 Comments
Midlife Activism: Never Too Late to Ignite Change

Activism megaphone: What calls YOU to action-

Written by 

Gee, I love my kids.

You’d think that as children grow up and fly away from the nest, one would get over the initial infatuation.

Not so. I lovingly remember my kids as babies, young children and even teenagers, but that’s not what tugs at me as I sit here in my empty nest.

What I love so much are the people those little ones became. I love their independence in their new lives, how they choose to express themselves, and their fresh confidence and strength—they absolutely take my breath away.

My son, daughter and son-in-law are on the brink of everything. The journey that lies ahead as they inch closer and closer to…dare I say…creating families of their own, is wide open.

Take my breath away

My son is taking a yoga class. He’s inspired to share with me his discovery of noticing his breath. Just like I eyed him breathing in and out when he was a sleeping infant under my mom’s handmade quilt, now this tall, handsome young man is teaching me the importance of harnessing my breath.

He reminds me that in the day-to-day balance of work as a climate activist and taking care of my empty nest, I sometimes forget to breathe—to stop and let this vital air wash over and renew me. Of course, I know exactly what he’s talking about. Not only have I dabbled in yoga for years, like him, I yearn for clean air to restore my body as I continue to grow.

Really, he takes my breath away.

Breathe in

I still worry. I worry about the things I can see, like the uptick in illnesses among my friends at mid-life. I also worry about the things I can’t see, like breath-altering pollution that causes asthma and climate change.

So in my mid-50’s, I changed course and decided to devote my work life to ensure we stop pumping unlimited amounts of climate pollution into the air—our children and grandchildren’s air.

And you know what? My work makes me feel optimistic!

Recently, my hope was renewed when the president announced the Clean Power Plan. This plan sets the first-ever national limits on carbon pollution from power plants, the nation’s largest source of climate pollution emissions. The Clean Power Plan sends a clear message to the rest of the world that we care about the health of our families, the safety of our neighborhoods, and our planet.

I put aside a severe fear of public speaking (believe me, my knees get weak just thinking about it) and traveled from New York to Washington, DC and Denver, to testify in support of this historic plan. The Clean Power Plan reflects unprecedented input from Americans, including 4.3 million comments.

The Clean Air Act protected the air, water and land for 40 years. With climate change now causing more severe temperature increases, dangerous sea level rise, and ferocious storms, our kids need this plan for the next 40 years and beyond.

Breathe out

I love my kids and I love my country. No matter how old kids become, parents are passionate. And when someone messes with the kids—watch out. Just as our parents protected us when the Clean Air Act was first passed in 1970, now it’s our turn to help reduce carbon pollution.

What do you want to take your breath away—spewing power plants, or your incredibly amazing children and grandchildren? No matter what political persuasion, we all share the air—and we all need it clean. I want it for my babes, and I want it for yours.

So as a climate activist and a mom, I invite you to join me, and over a half a million members of the Moms Clean Air Force, in securing a cleaner, safer future.

What calls you to action?

[For more activism inspiration read A Grandfather Takes Climate Action]

Bonus:

Here’s the latest episode of The Green Divas Radio Show for more on green and healthy living…

Listen to the latest Green Divas Radio Show—and other green and healthy living podcasts—daily on GDGDRadio.com (or get the GDGD Radio app)!

Asst. Ed. Green Diva Grace / Image via ShutterStock


(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({});


ronnie citron-fink with natural, silver hair colorRonnie Citron-Fink is a writer, editor and educator. She is the managing editor of Moms Clean Air Force. She has written and edited thousands of articles about green living and the environment for websites, books and magazines. Ronnie is the creator of Econesting.

Her posts can also be found on Huffington Post, Care2, Planet Green, Inhabitat, Yahoo!Green, Treehugger and other sites. Ronnie was named one of the Top Ten Living Green Experts by Yahoo. She has been a contributor to Family Fun and is included in their books. Ronnie was a teacher for many years and is the mother of two children. 

 

The post Midlife Activism: Never Too Late to Ignite Change appeared first on The Green Divas.

Source: GreenDivas News

GD Foodie-Phile: Cooking with Cannabis

by g4allblog 0 Comments
GD Foodie-Phile: Cooking with Cannabis

cannabis foodie

Well, who knew cannabis could be such a culinary delight and have health benefits?

I had fun talking to Green Diva Meg about cooking with cannabis in this  Green Divas Foodie-Philes episode. After listening, scroll down for an excerpt from my book, The Cannabis Kitchen Cookbook.

When the first humans were rooting around for sustenance, ethnobotanist and Harvard educator Richard Evans Schultes writes, the sticky tops of raw cannabis were likely among the seeds, nuts, and berries they explored.

The euphoria that resulted from eating those flowers, Schultes believes, may have spawned religion. Hindus believe that raw cannabis leaves were Lord Shiva’s favorite food.

Cannabis facts

Raw cannabis, part of the human diet since eating began, is a digestible complete protein with essential amino acids and omega fatty acids and the plant kingdom’s largest source of cannabinoids. Technically, it’s a vegetable. Yet it’s been largely ignored since humans discovered that heating cannabis flowers or otherwise extracting their resins height­ens their psychoactive effects. The plant has much more to offer than tiny crystal glands for extraction.

Unless you grow your own cannabis or have a friend who does, fresh leaves and flowers aren’t easy to find. Most growers dry cannabis flowers to maximize the resin’s psychoactive effects (and prepare them for market) and compost or discard the fan leaves and stalks at harvest. This is a tremendous waste. The plant has much more to offer than tiny crystal glands for extraction.

Cooking cannabis

Heating cannabis to convert the carboxylic acid THC-A into psychoactive delta-9 THC changes the plant’s chemical composition, stripping out cannabinoids—including a healthy dose of antioxidant and anti-inflammatory CBDs—and terpenes, which are being studied to treat a number of conditions, including epilepsy and cancer.

Dr. William Courtney, a Mendocino County physician, recently made headlines with his recommendation that patients eat raw cannabis flowers or juice raw cannabis fan leaves every day to maximize the herb’s therapeutic impact while minimizing psychoactive effects. Courtney’s domestic part­ner, Kirsten Peskuski, has been in remission from lupus, interstitial cystitis, and rheumatoid arthritis since she began the regimen of fifteen leaves and two large flowers a day, which requires having forty cannabis plants in cultivation. (Doctors in Colorado and California are writing recommendations that allow juicers to grow forty or more plants.)

cannabis leaf

The high points of raw cannabis (pun intended)

In “Cannabis as a Unique Functional Food,” Courtney states that heating THC reduces the total antioxidant dose it delivers to one-fiftieth of what it was when the plant was raw. He became a champion for raw cannabis after reading that CBDs could regulate commu­nication between human cells and immune systems and reduce inflammation. In addition to CBD’s benefits, the terpenes in raw cannabis boost mood and energy levels, Courtney posits, but THC-A won’t alter people’s minds. (A good number of Courtney’s patients aren’t interested in getting high.)

It’s true that consuming raw fan leaves, which have trace amounts of THC-A, won’t get most people high. But every person’s sensitivity to THC-A is different. When they eat raw cannabis flowers, some people feel the same euphoria that early hunters and gatherers expe­rienced. Whether THC-A must be “decarboxylated” through heat or extraction to produce psychoactive effects is a hotly debated—and deeply personal—subject.

For ethnobotanist Chris Kilham, who’s eaten the raw plant with indigenous people around the world, it’s a non-issue. Chris gets plenty altered when he blends raw flowers into smoothies. “If you eat cannabinoids, you get an effect,” Chris says. “Heating is not impor­tant, except to blend cannabis into other agents or to somewhat increase THC value. Eating raw cannabis is an old, common method. Eat cannabis, get high.”

As is always the case with cannabis, the only way to find out how eating raw flowers affects you is to try it. Start by blending the smallest flower you can find into juice or a smoothie. You should know in about an hour.

Bonus:

Listen in on the Green Divas Healthy & Beauty episode—Holli Thompson gives us a great 101 on grains. Why you should eat them, how you should eat them, what kind you should try, and recipes.

Images via ShutterStock


(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({});


 

Robyn_Lawrence-Book Jacket 2Robyn Griggs Lawrence helped introduce sustainable lifestyles and healthy homes to mainstream America as editor-in-chief of Natural Home magazine and explored the Japanese art of finding beauty in imperfection with The Wabi-Sabi House (2004), and Simply Imperfect: Revisiting the Wabi-Sabi House (2011). Her new mission is to educate people about how to safely prepare and imbibe organic, sustainably grown cannabis for health and wellbeing through The Cannabis Kitchen Cookbook, a collection of know-how, advice and recipes from America’s top cannabis chefs. Lawrence has been an editor with Organic Spa, Mountain Living, and The Herb Companion magazines, and has run successful blogs on Huffington Post, Care2.com and Motherearthnews.com. A certified yoga instructor, Lawrence also co-authored the e-book 7 Steps to a Safe, Nurturing Nursery, with Dr. Frank Lipman, M.D.


 

The post GD Foodie-Phile: Cooking with Cannabis appeared first on The Green Divas.

Source: GreenDivas News